Thursday, 10 January 2019

Mining on Vancouver Island

While Vancouver Island is most commonly associated with the resource-based industries of forestry and fishing, the island also has a strong and deep history of mining.

Coal mining began on the island (and surrounding islands) in the 1800s, with the discovery of coal in the Nanaimo region. This initial discovery was facilitated by local First Nations, who noticed the coal that Hudson’s Bay Company employees used and offered the information that coal was available locally.

Mining jobs brought many people to the island, creating small towns of workers (eg Cumberland) while areas of Nanaimo and Victoria were built upon the success of prominent mining families.

Mining became big business, first coal and then metals. The island is physically marked by the industry, with both small, abandoned mine sites and large decommissioned mine sites. Two large mines near Campbell River, Quinsam Coal and Myra Mines, are on-again off-again mines; with production being at the whim of global markets.

There are still individual mine claims throughout the back country of Vancouver Island as well as on the smaller islands and on the stretch of mainland coast across from northern Vancouver Island. Whether any of these are active is hard to determine. There are also still people who pan in the local rivers, hoping to find a gold nugget or two.

north Vancouver Island old mine site

Properties that come up for sale in the more remote areas of the islands can be impacted by a mining background. Some may be actual mine sites while others can be at least partially made up of old mining claims.
there were mine sites on the hillside of Port Neville

Hatley and Cragidarroch Castles, the community of Cumberland, Newcastle Island, the IslandCopper Mine outside of Port Hardy, small mining relics and tailings piles, unused mining claims, the numerous dams around Nanaimo – all of these are part of the legacy mining has created on Vancouver Island.


It’s a Coastal Lifestyle … Live it!

Thursday, 3 January 2019

6 Tips for Selling a Home in the Winter

1. Lighting
In the winter, especially on the coast where it is often grey outside in the winter months, lighting is crucial. Check that all your lights are bright and change out any weak or dim bulbs.  Look for dark areas in the house and see if lamps or strategically placed lighting will enhance those areas. Warm light in the winter is nice, as are the daylight style bulbs. There are many options to choose from nowadays, so pick a light that suits the space and the time of year.

2. Windows
Winter light often comes in at an angle, and dirty windows are really noticeable. Make sure the windows are clean and clear. During the day open the window coverings to let as much natural light in as possible while in the evenings have window coverings closed against the dark.



3. Warmth
People love to feel cozy in the winter, but keep in mind that they will be coming in with coats on after being out in the cold air, so a house interior will already feel warmer to them. In other words you want the home warm but not hot. A nice throw on the couch and some soft accent pillows will enhance the cozy feeling.

4. Cleaning
In the winter when the outside spaces are dormant and cold the inside needs to shine even more.  Make sure the indoor living spaces are sparkling. Flooring in the winter can quickly become muddy and dirty, so keep watch on that. Also mud rooms and entryways in the winter quickly get cluttered with coats, boots and gear which need to be cleared away.


5. Outdoor Lighting and Access
While people won’t spend as much time looking at the outdoors in the winter, they will notice a dirty entryway our one that is not well lit. Keep it clean and bright, so the entrances are reassuring, welcoming and safe.

6. Use Timers

Dark days in winter can meet sometimes outdoor lights should be one earlier, while a bright sunny day might mean lights don’t need to come on until later. A good timer from the hardware store can be set for a certain time or even better is to buy one that is light sensitive. This insures that when people show up the lights are on if needed.


It's a Coastal Lifestyle ... Live It!